The roads I take...

KaiRo's weBlog

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Displaying recent entries tagged with "CBSM". Back to all recent entries

Popular tags: Mozilla, SeaMonkey, L10n, Status, Firefox

Used languages: English, German

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May 5th, 2007

Do I wanna git more?

I've been hearing about git for a long time as I already was following LWN.net closely when all those BitKeeper vs. Linux kernel problems came up and Linus started to work on a replacement. Meanwhile, over just two years, that technology has matured enough that it's being used by a wide rage of projects nowadays.

While the Mozilla project will use Mercurial ("hg") in the future, I suggested trying git a few times and probably annoyed decision makers a bit with that, but our big problem is that we need decent support on Windows, and git is not there yet (even though current development looks promising for the future). Mercurial is probably a good choice as well, interestingly it has been started about at the same time as git for practically the same reasons - and it's probably compatible in multiple ways: Not only are both distributed version control systems (DVCSes), they're both using SHA-1 hashes to identify revisions, and even screen shots of their graphical tools look similar.

In any case, I've personally never used anything else than CVS, and that aged, centralized, per-file version control system has served me well for my private projects. I understand its usage as well as its repository quite well and I hardly ever run into its real problems like file moving or such.

That said, I always found git's concept of tracking content instead of files interesting (that's why file moves are more or less irrelevant to it), and tracking changesets instead of single-file-changes could also prove useful in my personal projects. Oh, and then there's one thing that really attracts me about DCVS solutions: I'm doing lots of work when I'm on a train without a net connection, history can prove useful to have there, as well as tracking several different changes to a single file - and then I'm merging this to my other computer and two production systems (or actually, checking in to a central repository and check out on those systems, in the CVS model). And then, learning new technologies is always a good thing.

So, I had enough reasons to try out git for my personal projects, and I spent about 6 hours today figuring out how to work with it, a set of directories I wanted to import, and how to import those from CVS. So far, it looks like everything has worked. Oh, and the PHP code generating this website and blog (the CBSM system) is now running off a git checkout. :)

After some time of working with this, I'll see if I want to git even more code into such repositories - for now, let's see how this works out ;-)

By KaiRo, at 02:03 | Tags: CBSM, git, hg, Mozilla | 3 comments | TrackBack: 0

April 12th, 2007

UME-Blogs gestartet

Das heir verwendete Weblog-System wurde ja nicht nur für mein persönliches Blog hier verwendet, sondern, um im CBSM-System sowie im damit verwandten Community-System (fynf.at und andere) überall verwendbar zu sein.
Dabei können nicht nur "offizielle" Blogs diverser Websites eingerichtet werden, sondern auch persönliche Blogs der registrierten Benutzer auf diesen Websites bzw. Communities.

Auf der Homepage der UME ("Unsere Macht Europa", eine virtuelle Partei im Online-Spiel "Power of Politics) ist jetzt der Anfang mit diesen persönlichen Blogs gemacht, auf http://ume.waehlt.at/blogs/ gibt's eine Übersicht der aktuellesten Beiträge in den dortigen Blogs.
Ich hoffe, dieses Feature wird noch kräftig genutzt und die Community der UME wird dadurch gut gefördert!

By KaiRo, at 17:19 | Tags: blog, CBSM, PoP | no comments | TrackBack: 0

March 26th, 2007

Pingback and TrackBack: ease of implementation (or not)

Finally I managed to implement pingback in addition to TrackBack, and it was interesting to implement both, to compare them from a developer's perspective - as both are technologies that enable other blogs to link back blog entries that link them and this way create a permanent connection between two blogs.

One target of pingback is said to be that it should be "implementable with minimal effort", I also read in a few places that it should not attract spam as easily as TrackBack. The latter has been achieved quite nicely, as the pingback client needs to tell the server the source URL containing the original link as well as its target, and the server needs to verify this link to this target actually exists in the source. TrackBack on the other hand just sends the the URL to link back to and needs no verifications, so strictly according to the spec, a TrackBack server just links back to anything anyone else tells it to link. Of course, most TrackBack servers nowadays do verify that their blog is linked from the source - as does this blog here, like I pointed out in a recent post here.
The ease of implementation was not such a clear win for pingback though in my case. Where it clearly wins over TrackBack is "autodiscovery" (automatically discovering link targets in a blog entry that are able to link back via one of those technologies): While TrackBack uses a rather complicated to detect RDF snippet that needs to be placed in the entry, pingback uses a very easy to read HTTP header (and an also easy to detect HTML <link> tag as a fallback) to detect if some page is pingback-enabled. Telling the other blog that it should link, i.e. actually "pinging" it, is quite simple on the TrackBack side though: do a simple HTTP POST with urlencoded data, get very simple XML as a reply that tells if it was successful or not, and that's it. Pingback on the other hand achieves that part via an XML-RPC call. This might be easy to implement if you have an XML-RPC server running on your site already, but if you don't, it requires you to send a rather deeply structured XML document in a POST request as a client, and as a server, to retrieve the data from that doc (I needed to spend some time to even find out how to get this body of the incoming request in PHP) and send an even more complicated XML reply. So the implementation of the actual ping is (without having working XML-RPC support in place already) much harder for pingback than for TrackBack. I guess there's rarely a technology that has only good sides to it...

BTW, I know that there's some XML-RPC support bundled with PHP (via XMLRPC-EPI), but as there's no good documentation of it anywhere (one case where the else good PHP manual really sucks), I even felt safer to manually deal with that form of communication.

That said, I got both technologies to hopefully work now on this blogging system, including autodiscovery for both of them (if both are supported, pingback is preferred), and I hope users of CBSM and our community system will like them. :)

By KaiRo, at 01:29 | Tags: blog, CBSM | no comments | TrackBack: 2

March 9th, 2007

feeds available for this blog

OK, after some more work, this blog is available through RSS and Atom feeds (Firefox and IE7 users should see the feed icon popping up, SeaMonkey users with the link toolbar enabled should see them listed there under "More > Other Versions" (from the blog overview page).

Once I have the tagging system in place, there will be filtered feeds available that list only certain tags and/or languages. For now, the feeds just list the articles the blog overview page carries - the RSS feed has subjects and links, the atom feed includes the full articles as well.

I probably should try to get the blog syndicated on some planet sites now :)

By KaiRo, at 02:13 | Tags: blog, CBSM | 1 comment | TrackBack: 0

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